Post-postfeminism?: Amelia Bullmore’s Di and Viv and Rose (2011), April De Angelis’s Jumpy (2011) and The Awkward Squad by Karin Young’

I recently had an article with the above title published in the theatre journal The Contemporary Theatre Review. The publishers have informed me that I can offer 50 ‘free views’ of this article on ‘my social media’. It should appeal to those interested in recent plays in the UK that are either ‘about’ or concerned with feminism and two of the plays feature on our plays with all female casts page on this blog (see here)

Amelia Bullmore author of one of the plays I discuss is also a performer and appears as DCI Gill Murray in Scott and Bailey discussed elsewhere on this blog (also see ). Bullmore also wrote episodes Scott and Bailey, while Karin Young also writes for the TV soap Emmerdale. De Angelis’s career as a playwright dates back to the 1980s and over the years her work has charted the various ‘waves’ of feminism. I have posted the abstract of the article below.

Click this link to see The Contemporary Theatre Review Article for free.

Abstract: Post-postfeminism?: Amelia Bullmore’s Di and Viv and Rose (2011), April De Angelis’s Jumpy (2011) and The Awkward Squad by Karin Young by Geraldine Harris.

In a 2013 essay analysing recent British, women-centred, television crime drama, eminent feminist theorist Charlotte Brunsdon suggests there is evidence that as a ‘generative sensibility’, postfeminism has peaked and is now waning. Discussions of postfeminism have been more prevalent in media studies but as both Janelle Reinelt (2006) and Elaine Aston (2010) have asserted in the field of ‘new writing’ for the theatre over the last decade or so, its impact has been evident through an overt lack of engagement with feminism. This article considers Brunsdon’s contention in relation to theatre through the analysis of three plays, Amelia Bullmore’s Di and Viv and Rose (2011), April De Angelis’s Jumpy (2011) and The Awkward Squad by Karin Young (2012), all of which refer back to feminism of the 1980s. Understood as part of a small but notable upsurge in cultural production that ‘re-visits’ and ‘re-claims’ aspects of this politics recent past often ignored, overlooked or rejected under the dominant postfeminist narrative, the success of these three plays can be perceived as part of a broader cultural moment in the UK in which feminism appears to be ‘fashionable’ again. As such, they offer the opportunity to learn some of the lessons not just of feminist history but of historiography, in regard of what ‘stories’ are told about this politics past in the present and what alliances these might enable in the future.

Gerry

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